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handling_suspicious_email_messages_and_spam [2017/02/10 10:00]
abrashear Rearrange introductory content.
handling_suspicious_email_messages_and_spam [2017/05/03 21:26]
abrashear [Is this message trying to get me to do something dangerous?] Add google phish oauth guideline
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 Emails which attempt to persuade you to do something dangerous often use language which adds urgency so that you are more likely to suspend your suspicion and perform the action anyways. Vague messages which implore you to open some link or attachment are frequently malicious. Examples of dangerous actions are:  Emails which attempt to persuade you to do something dangerous often use language which adds urgency so that you are more likely to suspend your suspicion and perform the action anyways. Vague messages which implore you to open some link or attachment are frequently malicious. Examples of dangerous actions are: 
   * **Providing usernames or passwords** — A common attack is to provide a link which looks like the login page to your email provider or other service. The attacker saves any password you submit, and uses it to hijack your account.   * **Providing usernames or passwords** — A common attack is to provide a link which looks like the login page to your email provider or other service. The attacker saves any password you submit, and uses it to hijack your account.
 +  * **Granting Application Access** — Some attacks may link directly to an account page which asks for permission to access your account. If you are not expecting to see an account access screen, the safest thing to do is close your browser window/tab.
   * **Transferring/​receiving money** — There are many scams which encourage you to receive a sum of money and forward it to someone else. Through various methods, you'll end up losing all of the money to the scammer.   * **Transferring/​receiving money** — There are many scams which encourage you to receive a sum of money and forward it to someone else. Through various methods, you'll end up losing all of the money to the scammer.
   * **Visiting malicious links** — Malicious links may look like links to trusted websites, or be random webpages on the internet. If you aren't sure if a link is safe, err on the side of caution and do not open it.   * **Visiting malicious links** — Malicious links may look like links to trusted websites, or be random webpages on the internet. If you aren't sure if a link is safe, err on the side of caution and do not open it.
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   * You have never dealt with the company directly.   * You have never dealt with the company directly.
-  * If you cannot find a way to unsubscribe. +  * You cannot find a way to unsubscribe. 
-  * If you unsubscribe from a company'​s mailings and continue to receive them.+  * You unsubscribe from a company'​s mailings and continue to receive them.
  
 Read the message and search for an //​unsubscribe//​ or //update subscription//​ link—usually at the bottom of the mail. Visiting that link will allow you to opt out of future mailings from that company. Read the message and search for an //​unsubscribe//​ or //update subscription//​ link—usually at the bottom of the mail. Visiting that link will allow you to opt out of future mailings from that company.
handling_suspicious_email_messages_and_spam.txt · Last modified: 2017/05/03 21:26 by abrashear